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Place To Visit In Norway

Museums In Norway

Place To Visit In Norway

 

Museums

Emanuel Vigeland Museum

Place To Visit In Norway.. For a freakish sensory overload, go into the Emanuel Vigeland Museum holding his life’s effort and burial chamber – a particularly intended arched chamber where you stoop beneath a low door (and therefore give honor to his ashes, incarcerated above) to go into a creepy nave with nearly no lighting.

As your eyes fine-tune to the dark, you’ll start to distinguish vast frescoes reaching up to a far-away ceiling. These represent human life from birth to death (occasionally erotically). Completely surfaced with smooth stone, the strange hall has such unbelievable acoustics that guests are necessary to be dressed in cloth booties to reduce the echoing thuds formed by the least footstep.

Norsk Folkemuseum

This charming al fresco museum holds approximately 150 buildings from dissimilar regions, typically dating as far back as the 13th century. Even though the buildings themselves are genuine, they’re contrasted in a Disney-eqsue amusement of a fictive landscape. Nonetheless, if you drink some Aass beers and squint, you’ll insist you’ve stepped back some hundred years.

You’ll ramble past old banks, pharmacies, post offices, barns and farmhouses and notice folk dancing and weaving and people wearing celebratory outfits. The Old Town part replicates an early 20th-century town and has a petrol station, a universal store, and a vast display of old toys, outfits, apparatus and appliances from across the nation.

Bryggens Museum

The archaeological Bryggens Museum was constructed on the location of Bergen’s first community, and the 800-year-old details uncovered during construction have been integrated into the exhibits, which take in medieval tools, pottery, skulls and runes. The enduring demonstration documenting Bergen in approximately 1300 is predominantly interesting.

The 800-year-old details uncovered during construction have been integrated into the exhibits, which take in medieval tools, pottery, skulls and runes. The enduring demonstration documenting Bergen in approximately 1300 is predominantly interesting.

 

Place To Visit In Norway
Place To Visit In Norway

Hanseatic Museum

The wonderful Hanseatic Museum gives a window onto the world of Hanseatic dealers. Accommodated in a rough-timber building from 1704, it simply discloses the difference between the strict livelihood and operational circumstances of Hanseatic commercial sailors and novices, and the lifestyles of the management.

Highlights take in the manager’s office, quarters, personal liquor cabinet and summer bedroom; the apprentices’ accommodation where beds were shared by 2 men; the fish storeroom, which hard-pressed and processed more than 1 million pounds (450,000kg) of fish each month; and the fiskeskrue, or fish press, which pressed the fish into barrels. Housed in a coarse timber building from 1704, the museum simply discloses the difference between the strict livelihood and operational circumstances of Hanseatic commercial sailors and novices, and the lifestyles of the management. Highlights take in the manager’s office, quarters, personal liquor cabinet and summer bedroom; the apprentices’ accommodation where beds were shared by 2 men; the fish storeroom, which hard-pressed and processed more than 1 million pounds (450,000kg) of fish each month; and the fiskeskrue, or fish press, which pressed the fish into barrels.

Fredrikstad Museum

The Fredrikstad Museum is accommodated in the same building as the tourist bureau in Gamlebyen and is well merit a look around. The below area houses momentary displays, while upstairs you’ll locate scale models of the Old Town and an attractive compilation of vestiges from 3 centuries of Fredrikstad’s city dweller, military and industrial actions. In addition on the top floor is a military museum.

  1. Heritage

Akershus Slott & Festning

A journey to Oslo is imperfect without taking in the medieval Akershus Castle and Fort. As you walk around the castle you’ll locate small rooms where exile nobles were kept, in bare contrast to the far more ornate dining halls and staterooms on the upper floors.

King Håkon V started building of the stone walled Akershus Festning (Akershus Fort) in 1299. It is intentionally positioned on the eastern part of the harbor and the park like grounds give outstanding views of the city and Oslofjord. The grounds are the sites for a mass of concerts, dances and theatrical shows during summer. The Akershus Festning Information Centre narrates the building of the fort. In 17th century, Christian IV restored Akershus Slott (Akershus Castle) into a Renaissance palace, even though the front continues particularly medieval. In its dungeons you’ll locate dark cubbyholes where exile nobles were kept under padlock and key, while the higher floors have banquet halls and staterooms.

The chapel is still employed for army events and the burial chamber of kings Håkon VII and Olav V lie underneath it. Tours of the castle are guided by students in period dress, and give interesting sketchy history; otherwise you can stroll through on your own.

Kongsten Festning

On what was one time called ‘Gallows hill’ remains the flower-festooned Kongsten Festning . Dating from 1685, it once served as a sentry and forewarning post for the troops at close to Gamlebyen. Eventhough it can get filled on summer weekends, this otherwise isolated and interestingly messy spot is an amusing spot to jumble around the turrets, embankments, walls and ramparts, or just be seated under the sun and absorb the stillness.

It’s a 10-minute stroll southeast of the Gamlebyen drawbridge (turn off Torsnesvien at Fredrikstad Motell & Camping

Theta Museum

This outstanding single-room renovation of a furtive Resistance headquarters, exposed by the Nazis in 1942, is currently Norway’s smallest museum. Suitably enough, finding it is still a challenge. It’s at the back the Enhjørningen restaurant; go through the alley and up the stairs to the 3rd floor.

University Museums

The 2 major University Museums take in: the Cultural History Collection with Viking armaments, medieval altars, folk artwork, era furnishings, Inuit and Aleut customs and exhibits nearly everything from Henrik Ibsen to Egyptian mummies; and the Natural History Collection.

Ofoten Museum

The Ofoten Museum informs of Narvik’s agricultural, fishing, railway building and ore trans-shipment tradition. There’s a progressing film about the Ofotbanen Railway and children will take pleasure in pressing the button that triggers the model train. Hang back as well over the display case of Sami clothing and artifacts and the set of historic photos, contrasted with modern shots acquired from identical angles.

To get to the museum, get the minor road next to the reinstated building that served as Narvik’s post office between 1888 and 1898.

Archaeological Museum

The well-kept Archaeological Museum, records 11,000 years of human history counting the Viking Age. Displays consist of skeletons, tools, a rune stone and an explanation of the symbiosis between primitive humans and their surroundings. There’s as well a full set of actions for kids (eg treasure hunts) in summer and it’s making a welcoming move to more interactive shows.

 

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